Four years of blogging along

WordPress has kindly reminded me that today, christmas eve, is the fourth anniversary of my blog.  I had remembered.

I was inspired by the leak of the Queen’s christmas message in which she mentioned the importance of village greens.  And she hadn’t even been lobbied by the Open Spaces Society.  I immediately put out a press release and then decided to start a blog with this as my first story.

It took me many hours to set up the blog; I was unfamiliar with the process and had to look up everything on the internet.  Eventually I posted the story.

Ripley village green  in Surrey

Ripley village green in Surrey

This is my 336th blog.  I have written on a variety of subjects, though many are to do with campaigns, national parks, access, commons, greens, paths, anniversaries, birds, the Chilterns, Turville and my land at Common Wood on Dartmoor.  According to WordPress’s inbuilt statistics, my most popular story was about the sale of Blencathra in the Lake District National Park (785 views, posted on 7 July 2014).

Blencathra south face.  photo: Wikipedia

Blencathra’s south face. photo: Wikipedia

Frustrations
Over the past four years WordPress has improved the site, but I still have frustrations. What you see in preview mode is not what you get when it’s published.  I have particular trouble getting photos to sit nicely side by side (as in this blog) and closing up the line spaces when I don’t want to make a new paragraph but just indent a piece of text. And, as I discovered while writing this blog, changing WordPress (with lower case ‘p’ which is what I intended and which appears as such on my preview) to WordPress (P) without my consent—cheeky!

Perhaps in time WordPress will sort these things out too.  Meanwhile I shall blog along merrily and I hope you’ll stay with me.

Happy christmas to all.

 

 

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About campaignerkate

I am the general secretary of the Open Spaces Society and I campaign for public access, paths and open spaces in town and country.
This entry was posted in green spaces, National parks, town and village greens and tagged , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

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